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Introduction and question

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Re: Introduction and question

Postby Victarion on Mon Oct 08, 2018 6:47 am

Hi,

I've intensively read many thread and posts regarding the proper maintenance of the bike. I have noticed several important things and I wanted some advice regarding the basics to get :

- I've read several time that snapping the bottom tube all the way in folded position too often will put a lot of tension on the belt. Is is correct ? A frame clip (such as https://www.google.lu/search?q=strida+fame+clip&rlz=1C1GCEB_enLU789LU789&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi6zZ27nvbdAhXsI8AKHUzRDioQ_AUIDigB&biw=2048&bih=1038&dpr=1.25#imgrc=c7Hn8se0o3DxhM:) is therefore a good idea, no ?

- Regarding the freewheel ? Do I need to change it right away by an aluminium one or should I wait for any sign of wear of the one currently mounted (recurrent belt skipping if I understood correctly ) ?

- Some inner tube in case of puncture and spare tyres ? Any brand recommanded. Should I stick with Schwalbe Kojack ? I've understood that there isn't of lot of choices in 18''.

- Which kind of tools (and size) I need to check and maintain the spoke of the wheels ?

- Any other recommandation ?

Regards,
Victarion.
Hofstadter's Law: It always takes longer than you expect, even when you take into account Hofstadter's Law.
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Re: Introduction and question

Postby Willie on Mon Oct 08, 2018 11:34 am

Hi Victarion - I am excited for you on the Strida purchase. Of all the bikes I own this is one unique bike for me.

Victarion wrote:
- I've read several time that snapping the bottom tube all the way in folded position too often will put a lot of tension on the belt. Is is correct ? A frame clip (such as https://www.google.lu/search?q=strida+fame+clip&rlz=1C1GCEB_enLU789LU789&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi6zZ27nvbdAhXsI8AKHUzRDioQ_AUIDigB&biw=2048&bih=1038&dpr=1.25#imgrc=c7Hn8se0o3DxhM:) is therefore a good idea, no ?


Correct.
For me when I purchased my Strida EVO's I got the frame clip with it. I was silly and didn't know what it was and threw it away as the local Strida distributor "crosses" their Stridas as well! I would NOT be surprised if you get the frame clip with your Strida so wait and see. If you do not - just buy one. Alternatively like me, who threw it away and then bought a new one - only to MIS-place it... what I do not is fold it and simple NOT criss-cross the frames to an X-shape. I leave mine loosely folded on the Strida bicycle stand.

Victarion wrote:- Regarding the freewheel ? Do I need to change it right away by an aluminium one or should I wait for any sign of wear of the one currently mounted (recurrent belt skipping if I understood correctly ) ?


Just use the current one till it is worn out or you are having issues. A free wheel when new should have really high tall distinct teeth. When worn it gets smooth on the edges and the size of the teeth reduces (from the wear). I actually purchased extra freewheels - 2 x plastics and 3 x metal. Honestly I think this free-wheel is over-hyped. I ran my original free-wheel for atleast 5,000km before it had any signs of wear. (metal one!), I am now approaching 14,000km and I am still on 2nd free wheel.

Just to compare my Strida EVO to my 8-speed chain bike. I wore out the 8-speed chainwheel in 3.5 months and had to replace it. My Strida EVO has been with me for almost 2 years with one free wheel replacement.

Victarion wrote:- Some inner tube in case of puncture and spare tyres ? Any brand recommanded. Should I stick with Schwalbe Kojack ? I've understood that there isn't of lot of choices in 18''.


Like all bikes, you should carry either a bicycle tube patch kit (to patch punctures on the roadside, or carry 2 tubes (ideally) and a small hand pump. The beauty of the Strida is you wont need to take the wheel off to repair a puncture - and if you do it's so easy as it's only attached to one side of the fork of the bike (not 2 sides like regular bikes). If you new to bikes, you should learn how to repair punctures in the event you are far away from a local bike shop.

Check out this guy on youtube and his 16" Strida - he changes his tube with bare hands :D
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OV8rr4OI9hg

There are ONLY two 18" tyres you can choose from:
Kojak: https://stridacanada.ca/product/schwalbe-kojak-tires/
Innova: https://stridacanada.ca/product/strida- ... inch-tire/

The Kojaks are the high pressure slicks (110PSI if I recall - need to check my bike). They cost 2x the price of the Innova and has a better ride IMO. As it's a slick tyre (no treads) - take care when riding in the wet. The Innova is better for wet weather, is fatter and softer (at 85 PSI)

Victarion wrote:- Which kind of tools (and size) I need to check and maintain the spoke of the wheels ?


You need a HEX key set to take the wheels off, etc (not that you need to!). But off memory this comes with a Strida hidden under the seat.
https://stridacanada.ca/product/strida-allan-key/

I never adjusted my spokes. They just sit there on my wheels...

Victarion wrote:
- Any other recommendation ?


Get use to the ride - it can be twitchy at first but you get used it quite fast. I honestly believe it's one of the LOWEST maintenance bikes there is since I own 5 bikes. Because it has no chain - there is no chain cleaning and lubing, no deraileur cleaning, no cassette cleaning, if you ride in the wet I wipe it down in < 2 mins ready to store / fold. I not had ANY flats using both the Kojaks or Innova's in the 14,000km but that comes down to the road etc and luck sometimes! (I have had flats on my other bikes - so could be luck). I ride up to 70KM in one cycle outing .. NO PROBLEMS. It's the MOST comfortable bike to ride compared to my road bikes etc... because it's up-right "Dutch seating" and the Kelvar belt makes it effortless. Disclaimer - the one speed may see you top out on a max speed and spin. I have the Strida EVO (3 gears) and it keeps me going to some degree. But however as you have the SX which is single speed - it's even LESS maintenance or items going wrong because you do not have the KS3 gear box. :D

If I owned an Strida SX... I would see myself atleast 5 years of good ownership (I owned my forst Strida EVO now for almost 2 years and I ride the crap out of it!) with minimum maintenance except wear and tear items such as :
- free wheel replacement (hard to say - probably 4000-7000km mark??
- tyres (they last for ages as you wont be skidding on those tyres and burning the rubber compound :lol:
- tubes if you get punctures....
- adjust handbrakes every now and then.. and replace brake pads once in a blue moon.
- not sure what "type of bike" owner you may be.... what I mean by this is I tend to wipe my bike down every ride (1-2 min job) of mud etc as I keep the bike indoors. I seen other owners ride in muck, wheels caked in mud etc and they NEVER clean. You may want to simply wipe down and keep the "Free wheel" clean of muck and dirt. Pebbles etc will wear out the free wheel. I am not saying hose it and clean it - just make sure there is no caked mud, pebbles etc... for me I rarely even wipe that as the flanges of the free wheel prevent most of the gunk even getting in. But I do read strange stories of free wheels wearing out in < 2000 km on this forum which is beyond me...

On the part of maintenance...if you took this Strida SX to the bike shop for the full service THEY ONLY will:
- tighten nuts/bolts, lube a few points to look busy(?)
- check tension of kelvar belt (this lasts for ages !)
- check brakes - replace as needed or adjust
I think that is it. There is no gear shifting, derailment or chain adjustments etc. It's a very simple bike.

THAT IS IT! It's the lowest maintenance bike I own.
Last edited by Willie on Mon Oct 08, 2018 12:17 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Introduction and question

Postby Blackstridaaustria on Mon Oct 08, 2018 12:12 pm

Hi Victarion,

yes, a frame clip is actually a good idea.
Just I think it is more the rear hinge which benefits and less the belt.
In fact is the rear hinge the Achilles heel of your Strida - and sometimes even the real cause of belt issues.

On the SX shown above there is already an aluminium freewheel mounted.
The signs of wear on the freewheels teeth can be seen easily - is there still a narrow rectangle visible on top of each tooth or is it just a line, moreover that one can see a more or less pronounced corner at one tooth side.
The signs, without using a sharp eye, are:
1. Belt gets loose
2. Jumping, Skipping
3. Twisting (often combined with rear hinge play)
4. Torn

Tubes/tyres:
You may have noticed already that this is an enourmous advantage on your Strida; compared to most of the other folding bike brands - nothing more easy than to change tubes or tyres :lol:
Sure, as long as it is not a burden for you I'd recommend a spare tube anyway.
I had the feeling in the past that Schwalbe tubes combined with Sclaverand valves are the best choice if you don't want to pump air each few days.
Yes right, there are just the original Innova tyres, Schwalbe Kojak and another slick, the Strozzapreti of Joseph Kuosac.
Tubes are btw interchangeable between Innova and Kojak - but not Strozzapreti.
Counterquestion:
Do you want to ride in rain or on sand or cobblestones?


For the spokes you need a spoke wrench of your choize in size 3,2 mm plus a piece of wood (that can be a stolen old cook spoon of Mom or even a piece of branch) - and your ears :wink:
Just knock on each spoke after another (separate; for example first the inner and then the outer).
Do you hear a clear tone (ignore the tone height)?
Yes -> That spoke should be Ok.
Do you hear a dull noise?
Yes - > That one is loose.

By today I've got perhaps 8 or 10 original wheels in hands - usually there are between 1 and 3 spokes per wheel loose. But I think that's better the newer the wheels are - maybe you find not a single one loose :D

Cheers,

Chris
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Re: Introduction and question

Postby Willie on Mon Oct 08, 2018 12:20 pm

Chris...

Ah the 3rd tyre -- the Strozzapreti of Joseph Kuosac.... I never seen this in Singapore. Let me re-read your post of that and the Efeno drive! :D
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Re: Introduction and question

Postby Blackstridaaustria on Mon Oct 08, 2018 5:23 pm

Willie wrote:Ah the 3rd tyre -- the Strozzapreti of Joseph Kuosac.... I never seen this in Singapore.

That tyre must be relatively new and it's from Japan...guess that you could order it directly?
(And buy it much cheaper than we here in Europe.)

@Victarion:
Yes, sorry, again OT, shame on me :oops:
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Re: Introduction and question

Postby Victarion on Mon Oct 08, 2018 8:17 pm

Whoa guys. That's a lot of adivces in very few posts. You are great !

I summarize:
- Frame clip is higly recommanded. To get quickly if not included in the box.
- Freewheel is already aluminium. No worries until first symptomes show anyway.
- Regarding Tubes and tyres. I am new to bike so I have to learn every bit. I will carry at least one tubes and a pump. And I will get patching kit for home (I never did it, so why not learning it now ?). In that way I could change the tube outside and get to home easily to patch the punctured one - .
-What about tyres ? Do they have to be replaced at each in case of puncture ? My guess is that unless it is a big hole (damage coming frrom big screw, big nail...) or tube petrudes when inflated , tyres will be OK. At least to cover the <8km per day of daily riding. Right ?
- Clean the bike frequently especially after use in bad weather and focus on belt, freewheel, rear hinge...
- To get a spokewrench. Not emergency.

Blackstridaaustria wrote:Do you want to ride in rain or on sand or cobblestones?

Rain yes. When feasable of course. For the terrain, only macadam and very few pavements portion. Why ?
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Re: Introduction and question

Postby Willie on Tue Oct 09, 2018 2:38 am

Hi Victarion,

Victarion wrote:- Regarding Tubes and tyres. I am new to bike so I have to learn every bit. I will carry at least one tubes and a pump. And I will get patching kit for home (I never did it, so why not learning it now ?). In that way I could change the tube outside and get to home easily to patch the punctured one - .


I think this is your choice and the distance/route you ride in and depends on your roads. For example to consider:
1. do you ride on really clean roads? Does it have sharp nails, broken bottles eg., sharp glass, etc? These will cut your tyres or cause punctures. For me in Singapore we are lucky to have clean roads and I NEVER had a single puncture on my Strida for approx 14,000 km.. (I did on my other bike though)
2. what route will you take, how far will you go out of the city areas, will you be riding in areas with NO taxi?
3. check out my rider's report and you see I have a pump and a small bike saddle bag (where I carry a cheap patch kit and spare tube inside). I ride up to 70KM and I love riding in the really early hours of the morning - in roads where there is no street addresses or people aka Nature Reserve.

Basically what I am saying is if you are doing short trips in the city - and have a problem with the bike, you can simply FOLD you bike - call a taxi - put the bike in the boot of the taxi like luggage and go home. Fix it at home or a local bike shop. A punctured tyre is cheap to fix -- in Singapore it's approx 3-4 Euro. I was once out 45km from home on my Strida and a thunderstorm rolled in -- I did JUST that. A taxi home.

Depending on your country - you can even bus/train it with the folded Strida. For me it is allowed in Singapore on all buses and trains. When folded it is smaller than a baby stroller or pram!

If you are like riding in secluded areas with no taxi coverage etc... get a saddle bag, patch kit, spare tube (x2 preferably in case you roll over glass or nails and they burst both your tyres). The Strida bike is the easiest of bikes to repair tyres because the frame only attaches to the wheels on ONE side (not both like in a conventional bikes. You do not even need to take the wheel off. (refer to my youtube in past post).

So you got some options :lol:

Victarion wrote:-What about tyres ? Do they have to be replaced at each in case of puncture ? My guess is that unless it is a big hole (damage coming frrom big screw, big nail...) or tube petrudes when inflated , tyres will be OK. At least to cover the <8km per day of daily riding. Right ?


You do not need to replace the tyre UNLESS you ran over something super large and sharp that it cuts your tyres. Tyres are generally really tough! You need to be super unlucky - like run over a sharp blade or shard of glass that it cuts your bike tyres open. Usually most punctures is a small nail that just protudes in.. in which assess the tyre. If no gaping hole you are fine just replace the tube and you are all set. (A set back of some time to replace tube, and cost of tube). Or as I mentioned in Singapore it costs 3-4 Euro to replace by a bike shop (maybe more in Europe??).

Unless your roads are really strewn with litter and nails/glass - you be unlucky to get punctures. Think of all the people walking especially ladies with open heels - if that cuts your bike tyres - what does it do to people...? So generally I would not expect a puncture especially on clean roads or if you are allowed to ride on paths in your country.

If you ride on the road (wear a helmet! And have bright lights for visibility) and do not ride in the "gutter".. where most of the rubbish is pushed aside to (sharp nails, etc).

Victarion wrote:- Clean the bike frequently especially after use in bad weather and focus on belt, freewheel, rear hinge...


I say this only because in my country the general maintenance of bikes is almost ZERO. A simple wet rag (I used an old bath cloth cut down to size), wipe in < 2 mins all the road dirt, and DONE. No more than 2 mins. Don't let road muck, grime, etc dry and cake up on the bike. It will save your investment and keep things clean and moving. If I rode my conventional chain bikes in the rain, I need to degrease my chain and drive train (cassette, crank, etc) and do a total re-lube - takes 10-15 mins for me) and is a messy affair. This is the beauty of the Strida low maintenance bike.

Victarion wrote:
Blackstridaaustria wrote:Do you want to ride in rain or on sand or cobblestones?

Rain yes. When feasable of course. For the terrain, only macadam and very few pavements portion. Why ?


This is important as it can determine which tyres are best for you. The Schable Kojak is a tyre I used currently but because it is a "high pressure racing slick tyre" --- it has NO treads. I hate this tyre when in the rain as I slip (and it's dangerous) when I ride over WET metal plating like manhole covers. I avoid them at all costs when wet. The Kojaks excel in dry weather in my personal opinion. They are good quality tyres - just not great in wet or snow. This is the tyre you are getting.

The other tyre I have on my other Strida is the stock standard Innova which is lower pressure at 85PSI and has a tread pattern. It rolls less well than the Kojak marginally, and makes a bit more noise due to the tread pattern but is fine.

I do not have experience with the Strozzapreti.

For now I say enjoy your NEW bike and get to 'know how it handles'.

All the best on your new Strida which I assume arrives today. :wink:
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Re: Introduction and question

Postby Blackstridaaustria on Tue Oct 09, 2018 10:55 am

Victarion wrote:Rain yes. When feasable of course. For the terrain, only macadam and very few pavements portion. Why ?


Willie already nailed it :D
For our area here I'd say Kojak (or Strozzapreti) for summer season and Innova for winter - that's it.
You will notice very soon that the Kojak's traction is very limited on wet surfaces or sand; please watch out!
Also you won't feel well with 7 bar or more on cobblestones :wink:

And the taxi/public transport flat tyre fixing "method" is also my first choice :lol:
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Re: Introduction and question

Postby Victarion on Tue Oct 09, 2018 1:09 pm

Got it.

On Strida.fr, which is official distributor for Luxembourg, I can get the Innova for 44€ each + pair of 18'' tubes for 4€ each + shipping cost for a total of 108€.
I will try to ride as it is first, with the Kojack, as weather is great currently (amazing post-summer here, I guess it is the same for you BSA ?) and forecast are still optimistic. I want to feel it before to do some "mods".

Willie, regarding quality of the road. Luxembourg is quite good. Especially Luxembourg-ville, the capital. Where I live this is bit less smooth because it is more rural but still very good when comparing to close neighbours such as France (where I grew up), Belgium (even worse)... And I will limit my interaction with the "gutter". Basically, my road are as follows:

From home to train station :
1) option 1 : 100m on the road. Then join a park, crossing tramway rails. To ride along the park (1.5km) on a long straight line that is large enought for a big truck and a bike to cross. It is smooth. No poteholes. It is used by bicycles and pedestrians and frequently cleaned.

2) option 2 : just reach the train station via normal road (but in that case there is a bridge to cross with a steep hill)

Train : +/- 20 min.

Then from train station to work:

Option 1) Take the funiculaire, join a long, flat and new bicycle lane (around 1km). Then join a park and (this is in my opinion the "trickiest" part) ride with leaves covering the ground during fall, humidity and even fog (slippery) for around 1km. Also the road isn't as flat but that's again very acceptable. My office is a villa in the park.

Option 2) Stay down in the valley, ride until elevator (smooth road and few paved) for about 1km. Take the elevator, and join the same park than option 1) but at a different entry point.

Option 3) Take any vertical moving vehicle to join upper city (funiculaire/elevator) and join the road instead of the park.

As you can see I have many choices. Let's wait and see. Anyway, my birthday is only the 19th of October. So it is possible that I have to wait to use the bike. AAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH :?
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Re: Introduction and question

Postby Blackstridaaustria on Tue Oct 09, 2018 8:04 pm

Victarion wrote:...amazing post-summer here, I guess it is the same for you BSA ?) and forecast are still optimistic.

Yes, you're right; here also a wonderful autumn :D
Just, to be honest I preferred recently most of the time my motorcycle, a 32 year old single cylinder Yamaha 8)

Edit: That type...
Image
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Re: Introduction and question

Postby Victarion on Wed Oct 10, 2018 1:50 pm

Blackstridaaustria wrote:... a 32 year old single cylinder Yamaha 8)


Now we are talking! :wink:
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Re: Introduction and question

Postby Victarion on Wed Oct 10, 2018 8:41 pm

I've just received the strida. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
It is gorgeous :shock:
My wife loved it right away.
They call this champagne but it actually closer to a gold mate paint. But not in a mate way. :roll: . Don't really know if I am clear...

I haven't had the time to try it and won't be able to do it before next Saturday as I am leaving fro Paris 2 days for the Auto Show tomorrow.

I had the time see that : kickstand, ringbell, fenders, mud flap, aluminium freewhell where present but no frame clip. 2 small keyring that act as blinking light
Light scratching visible on the frames but totally acceptable for second hand. No sign of wear on pedals or freewhel, tyres are in very good condition. The bike is nearly mint.
Try to fold and unfold it. OK. Need to get the "snap the left handbar" trick.
Changed the seat height. Twice because I was way to low the first time. It is not the easiest system. Anyway once set, this shouldn't change.
Wheels don't wooble.
At first everything seems in perfect working conditions.
I lied, I've tried but in my dinning/living room :lol:
Positions seems comfortable. I am surprised.

I am happy men.
I post an update after testing this weekend.
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